BLOOD MOON: Next red moon will be biggest of the 21st century

Ciaran McGrath – June 21, 2018

NEXT month’s “blood moon” eclipse will be the biggest the world has witnessed so far this century, with large swathes of Europe in line for a spectacular visual display on the night of July 27.

And if that isn’t enough to whet the appetites of amateur stargazers, Mars will the closest to Earth it has been since 2003.

During a total lunar eclipse, the sunlight which reaches the Moon is refracted by Earth’s atmosphere, which filters out the Sun’s blue light – making the moon look red.

Next month’s eclipse will be especially long because the Moon will pass almost directly through the centre of the Earth’s shadow or umbra.

The Earth will be at its furthest point from the Sun on the day in question, allowing it to cast a bigger shadow.

And the Moon will be at its most distant point in its monthly orbit around the Earth.

Writing on the earthsky.org website, Bruce McClure said next month’s blood moon would last an hour and 43 minutes.He said: “This lunar eclipse is primarily visible from the world’s Eastern Hemisphere – Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

https://www.express.co.uk

How the moon and big tides could be a trigger for big earthquakes

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tide-earthquakes

Rong-Gong Lin II _ September 24, 2016

It’s one of the most enduring mysteries in earthquake science: Why do small earthquakes stay small, while others grow into monsters?

A group of researchers offered a partial, but tantalizing answer this month: The moon and big tides.

The scientists zeroed in on times of high tidal stress, which can occur twice a month, during the full moon and new moon. During these moments, high tides are at their highest — flooding the tallest reaches of a beach — and about six hours later, low tides are at their lowest for the month, with seawater retreating to the farthest point toward the ocean.

This produces massive movement of ocean water and produces high tidal stress. And that tidal stress can change the stress on the fault, and, these scientists suggest, help push small earthquakes that happen to grow into very large earthquakes.

http://www.latimes.com